Q&A: How Do You Make Your Resume Look Nice to Employers When You Have Nothing to Put on Your Resume?

scratching_head

Q: How do you make your resume look nice to employers when you have nothing to put on your resume?
-thegreatone

A: Oh Great One (Sorry, I couldn’t help myself. đŸ™‚ ), there’s really nothing to it (no pun intended)! A good resume will include about 4-6 sections. They include:

1.) Heading
Should include your contact information, which a potential employer will need to contact you. Your contact information should consist of your name, current address (or mailing address), working telephone number, and the email address you check regularly. It may be a good idea to include your cell phone number as well, if the employer is more likely to reach you on that number than they are at home. Please be mindful of the impression a would-be employer will get from your email address. If it is not professional, create a new one at Yahoo or Gmail, etc.

2.) Objective
You may elect to include an “Objective Statement” or “Headline” though the need for one is widely debated. This should be one line and should catch the employer’s eye, making your resume stand out. Some examples include “Hard worker seeks Errand Runner position” or “Recent Graduate seeks Entry-position.”

3.) Summary of Qualifications (AKA Skills and Abilities)
Detail (in bullets) a list of what you have to bring to the table. This includes your knowledge, skills (things you have learned to do), and abilities (things you are inherently good at). Any attributes you have that may be desirable to an employer should be listed here as well. Be careful not to overdo it. If you aren’t sure what an employer is looking for, read their job postings. For a list of skills to choose from, see http://jobsearch.about.com/od/skills/fl/general-skills.htm

4.) Education
Where you attended high school, college, or any other training that might qualify you for the job you are applying for. If you did not graduate, you may consider listing any appropriate coursework.

5.) Experience
Any paid and unpaid experience can go here. Volunteer experience is often much more valuable since the scope of the work tends to be greater. Think carefully about what you have done, even babysitters and paper route runners have valuable skills .

6.) Memberships
Any clubs/organizations you may belong to. Be careful about any that disclose your gender or race to avoid discrimination.

If you are unsure of how to piece these all together, consider using a resume template. You can find one in Microsoft Word or any other word processing software you may use.

Best Wishes!

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